“Defamation”

“Flying Drones”

“Is It Time for an Estate Plan Checkup?”

アメリカ 弁護士 法律事務所 法律 相続計画の見直し

Life doesn’t stand still, and after you’ve crafted an initial estate plan, your circumstances are likely to change-you may acquire more assets, the executor you originally selected may pass away, or you may contract a serious illness. Your children will grow up, or you and your spouse may split up. And the law may change, making some of your estate planning obsolete, or even counterproductive.
So it’s a good idea to review your estate plan at least once a year to make sure any changes are accounted for. (You can pick a certain day, like your birthday or the Fourth of July or some other date that will jog your memory to do this annually.) To get you started, US Legal News is including a checklist detailing those life events that may impact your estate plan. If you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, it may be time to contact your attorney.
– Have you married or divorced?
– Have your children married or divorced?
– Do your children or any other beneficiaries need protection from creditors?
– Have your relatives, other beneficiaries, or executor died, or have your relationships with any of them changed substantially?
– Has the mental or physical condition of any of your relatives, other beneficiaries, or executor changed substantially?
– Have you had more children or grandchildren, or have your children gone to college or moved out of, or back into, your home?
– Have you moved to another state?
– Have you bought, sold, or mortgaged a business or real estate?
– Have you acquired major assets (car, home, bank account)?
– Have you inherited significant property?
– Have your business or financial circumstances (estate size, pension, salary, ownership) changed significantly?
– Has your state tax law (or have federal tax laws) changed in a way that might affect your tax and estate planning?
– Have you changed your ideas about what to do with any of your assets?
– Have you decided to do more (or less) charitable giving?
– Have you made gifts that should be taken into account, such as reducing bequests that were to occur under your will?
When you do update your estate plan, you should also update your will and final instructions with updated addresses and phone numbers of beneficiaries, trustees, executors, and others mentioned in the estate planning documents. This will make settling your estate much easier. Estate planning is an incredibly important part of planning for your and your family’s future; but it is just as important to make sure that any estate plans that you already have are accurate and up to date.

(Winter 2009)

“Protecting Your Nest Egg”

(Winter 2009)

“When Your Guests Drink and Drive: Understanding Dram-Shop and Social Host Liability Law”

“Tips to Remember When Selecting a Long-Term Care Insurance Plan”

アメリカ 弁護士 法律事務所 法律  長期介護保険プラン選択基準

  • Before you choose a specific policy, check out the company. Be sure that the company you choose is likely to be around and solvent for a long time. Pick a company with a financial rating of B+ or better from financial-ratings services such as A.M. Best, Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and Weiss..
  • Make sure your policy will pay benefits for all levels of care in a nursing home (including custodial care), as well as care in assisted-living facilities or other residential-care facilities..
  • A good policy will pay benefits for home care and hospice care, including in-home personal care to help with activities of daily living..
  • Consider whether the amount of daily benefits provided by your policy will beadequate in the future. You should consider only policies with an inflation adjuster that increases benefits by a set percentage, compounded each year..
  • Do not assume that more years of coverage is always better. Very few people need nursing home care for five years or more. Four years is sufficient coverage for most. Three years may be acceptable if the cost of more coverage is simply too much for you..
  • Six months is a reasonable exclusion period for preexisting conditions..
  • Better policies allow payment of nursing home or home health benefits without requiring a prior period of hospitalization as a condition of coverage..
  • Most policies impose waiting periods (commonly 20 to 90 days after you begin receiving nursing home care or home care) before payments under the policy begin. First-day coverage will increase your premium. Consider self-insuring for the maximum waiting period, since utilizing the maximum waiting period will result in significant savings on premium payments. If you have to pay during the waiting period, the loss likely will not be catastrophic..
  • Avoid policies that pay only for “medically necessary” care; this standard is often too discretionary. Most good policies will cover care when the individual needs help with two or more activities of daily living (bathing, eating, dressing, toileting, transferring into or out of a bed or chair, or continence) or, alternatively, when the individual suffers a cognitive impairment. Be sure your policy covers Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. More than half the residents of nursing homes suffer some form of dementia..
  • Buy a policy only from a company that is licensed in your state and has agents physically present in your state. Out-of-state mail-order policies may leave you powerless to remedy problems if anything goes wrong .

(Fall 2008)

“Plan for Your Long-Term Care”

“Military Families: Protect Your Credit History”

アメリカ 弁護士 法律事務所 法律  給料日ローン:軍人の家族と信用記録の保護 If you or a member of your family is preparing for a military deployment, the last thing you want to deal with is identity theft. According to a Federal Trade Commission survey, in 2005 8.3 million Americans were victims of this crime. On average, these victims spent four hours working to restore their identity and credit, but for over 10 percent, it took at least 55 hours to get things straightened out.
Thankfully, an amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act is intended to help military families avoid this hassle. Under the Act, “active duty alerts” are available to members of the military who are away from their usual duty station. Your credit report includes information about your address, your bill payment history, and whether you have ever filed for bankruptcy or been arrested or sued. This information is then sold by a nationwide consumer reporting company to businesses that are considering extending you credit. If you have such an active duty alert on your report and a business is attempting to extend credit to someone in your name, the business will see the alert and then must verify the identity of the person seeking credit. This extra step makes it much more difficult to steal the identity of an active duty military member.
Be aware that such precautions are not perfect-if you are interested in getting credit while an alert is in place, it can be time consuming as the business will have to confirm your identity, which may be difficult once you are deployed. However, chances are good that this inconvenience will be much less than that associated with trying to repair your credit.
If you or a family member is interested in obtaining an active duty alert, simply call the toll-free number of one of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies:

You will have to provide identifying information, which can include your name, address, Social Security number, and other personal information. Unless you request that it be removed earlier, such alerts are effective for one year. To learn more about your credit rights, visit ftc.gov/credit.
This amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act is just one of a number of legislative efforts aimed at helping servicemembers and their families. For example, the federal government passed a law in 2006 that imposed limits on the ability of payday lenders to target military personnel. Servicemembers and their families should take full advantage of any and all benefits such as these that are offered, both before and during deployment. The Web site of the National Military Family Association (www.nmfa.org) provides detailed information on such programs. Like many financial and identity theft protections, these tools only work if you use them.
Alerts Also Apply To Reservists!
Don’t worry if you or a family member is a reservist – active duty alerts still work. So long as you are on active duty and are away from your usual station, you are eligible for active duty alerts, regardless of your status as a reservist.

(Fall 2008)

If you or a member of your family is preparing for a military deployment, the last thing you want to deal with is identity theft. According to a Federal Trade Commission survey, in 2005 8.3 million Americans were victims of this crime. On average, these victims spent four hours working to restore their identity and credit, but for over 10 percent, it took at least 55 hours to get things straightened out.
Thankfully, an amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act is intended to help military families avoid this hassle. Under the Act, “active duty alerts” are available to members of the military who are away from their usual duty station. Your credit report includes information about your address, your bill payment history, and whether you have ever filed for bankruptcy or been arrested or sued. This information is then sold by a nationwide consumer reporting company to businesses that are considering extending you credit. If you have such an active duty alert on your report and a business is attempting to extend credit to someone in your name, the business will see the alert and then must verify the identity of the person seeking credit. This extra step makes it much more difficult to steal the identity of an active duty military member.
Be aware that such precautions are not perfect-if you are interested in getting credit while an alert is in place, it can be time consuming as the business will have to confirm your identity, which may be difficult once you are deployed. However, chances are good that this inconvenience will be much less than that associated with trying to repair your credit.
If you or a family member is interested in obtaining an active duty alert, simply call the toll-free number of one of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies:

You will have to provide identifying information, which can include your name, address, Social Security number, and other personal information. Unless you request that it be removed earlier, such alerts are effective for one year. To learn more about your credit rights, visit ftc.gov/credit.
This amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act is just one of a number of legislative efforts aimed at helping servicemembers and their families. For example, the federal government passed a law in 2006 that imposed limits on the ability of payday lenders to target military personnel. Servicemembers and their families should take full advantage of any and all benefits such as these that are offered, both before and during deployment. The Web site of the National Military Family Association (www.nmfa.org) provides detailed information on such programs. Like many financial and identity theft protections, these tools only work if you use them.
Alerts Also Apply To Reservists!
Don’t worry if you or a family member is a reservist – active duty alerts still work. So long as you are on active duty and are away from your usual station, you are eligible for active duty alerts, regardless of your status as a reservist.

(Fall 2008)

“Payday Loans: Quick Approval to Long-Term Debt?”

“Supreme Court Update: The Second Amendment”